What are your nine powers? Name them… six…

wind primrose: our lady of swift enchantment

I arise today through

The swiftness of wind

i make the invisible

clear

teardrops of the goddess

i have held

if you see me

you know it’s ancient

i am the first

and the last

a bunch of me

or nothing

thirteen

and the fairies welcome you

offer me at midsummer

to the green woman

garlands at her feet

to see me

you’d think sun

but i am as deep

as the moon

black and grey

I will give

my silver crown

my golden ring

and my black hair

to get you back

from your own

dark enchantment

my sister

who is gold

and needs to shine

with help from

earth

sea and

sky

we will rescue 

you from the

black swan

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Primrose for enchantment. The first rose. Primula. And she is the first of the year. Racing with the snowdrops to break through.

You are the rebirth of Spring. The keys to Spring. The first sunny hello to regrowth. A small cheer in my heart. The sunny enchantment after the stillness of winter. You are eternal love. A courting gift. Small fairies and gnomes use your flowers as dwellings. Freyja, the Norse Goddess, loves you. As she flies over the earth in early morning, she weeps a morning dew. You fall from her hair. Freyja’s Tears. Her gracious gift to us.

We have a long history of complicated connections to and from the fairy world through you. A connection we seem to want and yet don’t want. Your display is protection from fairies for us and for horses, cows and sheep. Suitably Primrose-garlanded, you will protect them from pixie mischief at Beltane.

Conversely, you make the invisible visible, your oil will help us to see fairies. 13 or more flowers will guard us from evil magic but let the good stuff through. Under 13 and we are taking our chances with bad luck. The right number in a bouquet lets us into the fairy rock, the wrong number and we are doomed. The crossing of boundaries is a precarious business. An elf princess was turned into a primrose flower for falling for a mortal.

The tale in the latter part of the poem is a Grimm one, Primrose and Feather. You’d think sun for Primrose for their timing and colour. Interestingly, the tale has Feather as sun and Primrose as moon. This gives her different depths. It is a beautiful tale about two sisters, love and going through grief.

It talks of inter-species communication and cooperation. In exchange for Primrose’s treasures, a magpie, a mermaid and a giant offer help in the search for her kidnapped sister.

Lots of shapeshifting. A sorcerer who changes himself into a black swan in order to chase, but never catch, Feather, who he has turned into a white swan. In turn, under chase from Team Primrose, even more. Her net cannot capture him, the magpie helps lift it higher. The sorcerer falls into a river, becomes fish. The mermaid catches him but he changes into a deer. On land, the giant picks him up and eats him. Feathers transforms back into herself. Her beauty shines like the sun.

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